When you need or want to repaint your car, finding a reputable company to do the work at a reasonable price is of great importance. In general, you can expect to spend anywhere from about $300 to $20,000 to have your car repainted. It all depends on your needs, your wants, and the shop you choose. In this article, we have compiled information to help guide you to an informed decision so that you can feel confident when investing in a new paint job.

In This Article

  • Well-Known Places Where to Get Your Car Painted

  • A Word About Local Auto Paint Shops

  • How Do You Know Which Shop to Trust?

  • How Much Will Painting Your Car Cost?

Well-Known Places Where to Get Your Car Painted

1. MAACO

  • Cost: Begins at about $300. An estimate is required for exact pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies based on package selected — one-year (Basic); three-year (Preferred); five-year (Premium).
  • Basic Package: includes single-stage enamel paint and color match.
  • Preferred Package: includes single-stage paint with urethane, which resists chipping.
  • Premium Package: includes a two-stage paint service.
  • Platinum Package: adds a light chip/crack repair, prime and sand after the first prep, a urethane sealer, and a five-year warranty against fading and peeling.
  • Locations: Nationwide and Canada — find a MAACO shop near you and schedule an estimate.

2. Earl Scheib

  • Cost: Begins at about $100 in addition to a required Car Prep Package that costs about $200 to $300. Other package prices are Silver at about $400, Platinum at about $600, and Diamond at about $1,000 in addition to a required Car Prep Package.
  • Warranty: Varies based on package selected — one-year (Silver); three-year (Platinum); six-year (Diamond).
  • Silver Package: includes two coats of acrylic polyurethane paint in Earl Scheib colors only.
  • Platinum Package: includes three coats of paint, most factory colors, and an integrated clear coat.
  • Diamond Package: adds a base clear coat, Protech protection plan, and a UV protection plan.
  • Locations: Nationwide; however, no location locator tool is available. Use popular search engines like Google or Bing and enter “Earl Scheib” and your zip code to find one near you.

3. Econo Auto Painting & Body Works

  • Cost: Not specified. An estimate is required for exact pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies based on package selected — one-year (Enamel Deluxe); two-year (Polycrystalline Finish); three-year (Poly-Supreme); four-year (Fulthane Urethane).
  • Enamel Deluxe Package: includes hand sanding, masking to protect windows and chrome, and enamel paint.
  • Polycrystalline Finish Package: includes hand sanding, dual action machine sanding, masking to protect windows and chrome, and catalyzed automotive enamel.
  • Poly-Supreme Package: includes hand and dual action machine sanding, masking of windows and chrome, and painted with catalyzed enamel and an integrated clear coat finish.
  • Fulthane Urethane Package: includes the same process as the Poly-Supreme and adds a full coat sealer and a DuPont/Axalta urethane paint.
  • Locations: Southeast US — find an Econo shop near you.

4. Service King

  • Cost: An estimate is required for pricing. Also, Service King will not paint unless the vehicle has body damage and that damage is repaired.
  • Warranty: Lifetime on workmanship but not material.
  • Packages Available: No packages available.
  • Locations: Nationwide — find a Service King shop near you.

Dealerships are another option, especially if your car is the same make the dealership sells. They are sure to have the proper specs to ensure the highest quality job. Any dealership will paint basically any make and model, too. For example, if you own a Lexus, your local Ford or Nissan dealership will paint your car. The list below includes most of the parent companies (i.e. one company produces other makes, such as Ford making both Ford and Lincoln).

5. Ford

  • Cost: An estimate is required for pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies by dealership; not covered by Ford because dealerships are independently owned and operated. Be sure to ask the dealership about a warranty on labor as well as about a warranty on material.
  • Packages Available: Varies by location.
  • Locations: Nationwide — Use the Ford dealership locator tool.

6. GM

  • Cost: An estimate is required for pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies by dealership; not covered by GM because dealerships are independently owned and operated. Be sure to ask the dealership about a warranty on labor as well as about a warranty on material.
  • Packages Available: Varies by location.
  • Locations: Nationwide — Use the GM dealership locator tool.

7. Toyota

  • Cost: An estimate is required for pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies by dealership; not covered by Toyota because dealerships are independently owned and operated. Be sure to ask the dealership about a warranty on labor as well as about a warranty on material.
  • Packages Available: Varies by location.
  • Locations: Nationwide — Use the Toyota dealership locator tool.

8. Nissan

  • Cost: An estimate is required for pricing.
  • Warranty: Varies by dealership; not covered by Nissan because dealerships are independently owned and operated. Be sure to ask the dealership about a warranty on labor as well as about a warranty on material.
  • Packages Available: Varies by location.
  • Locations: Nationwide — Use the Nissan dealership locator tool.

A Word About Local Auto Paint Shops

No matter where you live, there is almost always a privately operated body shop that can do the work. You could find them using a search engine like Google or Bing. Edmunds.com suggests finding a good one through word of mouth. Let family and friends know what you need. They may know of a shop that has done excellent work.

Most shops use the same methods for calculating the cost of painting services as the national retailers and dealerships. Therefore, you will likely pay the same set rate that other big name companies are charging for a similar job.

However, in the long run, using an independent may save you time and money because the technicians are typically paid by the hour and don’t have quotas to contend with. This translates into a more carefully completed job with similar warranties as what retailers and dealerships offer (most warranties are supplied through paint manufacturers). To learn more, visit Autoblog’s article about dealers versus independent shops.

 How Do You Know Which Shop to Trust?

No matter how great a company’s local reputation is, things can go awry. Some business locations tend to perform better than others. Before you decide on which shop to use, research that specific shop’s history by looking up reviews on different sites, such as Yelp, Google (when you search for shops near you using Google, review made through Google will appear), and Angie’s List. One of the best and most trustworthy tools to use is the Better Business Bureau. You can find the shop’s rating, as well as whether any complaints have been filed against it and how it responded, by visiting the Better Business Bureau’s site and entering the appropriate information.

How Much Will Painting Your Car Cost?

The cost depends on the condition and the type of your vehicle as well as which package you choose. Reputable body shops will not paint your car without ensuring that the condition of the vehicle is ideal — in other words, that the paint will bond and no defects will show through the paint. It’s much like prepping to paint a wall in your home. Nicks, matches, rust, and dents will all show through your new paint. Earl Scheib will paint your car, but only if you purchase the Car Preparation Service (see the fine print at bottom of page). MAACO includes the cost of basic prep in the $299 starting price.

If your car needs more than some basic prep, you should expect to pay more. For example, if your vehicle has rust on sections of the fenders before any painting can be done the shop will need to remove the rust and treat the surface to prevent the rust from returning. If the rust has actually eaten through the fender, you will need a new one, which increases the cost.

Another aspect to consider with cost involves which package you choose. According to CarsDirect, a low-end paint job will be between $250 and $400 (single-stage enamel or acrylic paints), a mid-range job between $1,000 and $5,000 (higher quality paints, including Sherwin Williams, Trinity 1945, Diamond, DuPont, and PPG), and a high-end job between $5,000 and $20,000 (specialty paints and finishes).

In Summary

Painting your car is a big investment, and you want to get the best value. Remember that your costs will depend upon the type of vehicle you have and its condition. Make sure to get a detailed estimate so you know exactly what the service includes and check the shop’s ratings with the BBB and online reviews to see if anyone has had issues. With this information, you can find the best shop available to make your car look showroom ready. Enjoy choosing where to get your car painted.