You have a money order, but you don’t have time to take it to a bank, grocery store, or check cashing place during normal business hours. What next? Don’t worry — instead of taking a money order to a bank teller, you can deposit your money order at an ATM. In this article, we’ll cover how to use this method to cash a money order, what types of money orders can be deposited at an ATM, the fees associated with this practice, and everything else you need to know about money order ATM deposits.

In This Article

Can You Deposit a Money Order at an ATM?

Yes, many banks allow you to deposit money orders at the ATM. As long as you have an ATM card you’ll be able to deposit your money order. Treat the money order as you would a check; just sign the dotted line and following the ATM’s deposit instructions.

What Type of ATM Does It Have to Be?

Unlike withdrawals, which you can do at any ATM, you can only make deposits — including money order deposits — with your own bank’s ATM.  In addition, many ATMs only dispense cash and can’t receive deposits, so make sure the ATM you’re using is one that can receive deposits.

What Type of Money Order Does It Have to Be?

All types of money orders — USPS, MoneyGram, and Western Union — can be despited at eligible bank ATMs.

Banks That Allow ATM Deposits of Money Orders

We’ve come up with a list of all of the banks that will allow you to deposit money orders at the ATM. Most banks treat money orders the same as checks and don’t allow you to have access to the funds right away.  So to help you out, we’ve also included how long you’ll have to wait before you’re able to fully access the funds.

1. Capital One

  • Provisional access to funds: May grant you $100-$200 right away, depending on your account
  • Full access to funds: Available the next business day.
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest Capital One

2. Chase Bank

  • Provisional access to funds: May grant you $100-$200 right away, depending on your account
  • Full access to funds: Available the next business day.
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest Chase Bank

3. Citizens Bank

  • Provisional access to funds: None
  • Full access to funds: 24-72 hours, though in rare circumstances it may take up to 10 days
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest Citizens Bank

4. Santander Bank

  • Provisional access to funds: Immediate access to $100, access to $200 on the next day
  • Full access to funds: Two business days after the deposit
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest Santander Bank

5. SunTrust Bank

  • Provisional access to funds: May grant you $$200 right away, depending on your account
  • Full access to funds: 3-5 business days
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest SunTrust Bank

6. TD Bank

  • Provisional access to funds:  Immediate access to $100
  • Full access to funds: Available in two business days
  • Source: Customer service
  • Find your nearest TD Bank

7. Wells Fargo

Banks That Don’t Allow ATM Deposits of Money Orders

The following banks do not accept money order deposits through the ATM:

  • Ally Bank
  • Bank of America
  • PNC Bank
  • Regions Bank

Alternative Methods of Depositing Money Orders

If you can’t deposit a money order at an ATM, you can also try depositing the money order with a mobile app. The following banks allow you to use the mobile check deposit option on money orders:

  • Chase Bank
  • Citibank
  • Fifth Third Bank
  • HSBC
  • KeyBank
  • M&T Bank
  • Mountain America Credit Union
  • PenFed Credit Union
  • Santander Bank (except for USPS money orders which will not scan)
  • TD Bank
  • U.S. Bank
  • Wells Fargo

For more information on using mobile deposit for money orders, see our article Can You Mobile Deposit a Money Order/Deposit It Online? Here’s How

If all else fails, you can deposit your money order the old-fashioned way, by taking a trip to your closest bank branch and depositing it with a real live teller.

In Summary

Overall, many banks will treat your money order just like a traditional check and will allow you to deposit it using many of their usual check-depositing methods. Yes, you can always take a money order into a bank and deposit it the old way, but why not try something new? Many bank ATMs will let take your money order deposit and even grant you access to some provision funds until the full amount hits your account.