Jobs for 11, 12, 13 Year Olds: Summer Jobs and After School Jobs

In this article, we uncover jobs for 11-year-olds, jobs for 12-year-olds, and jobs for 13-year-olds.

Due to federal and state labor laws, there are very few businesses that are able to hire 11-, 12,- or 13-year-old employees.

However, there are still plenty of ways for entrepreneurial kids to make money (even good money). If you’re in the 11-t0-13 age range now but are interested in the jobs you can hold in a few years, you can also check out our article about jobs for 14- and 15-year-olds.

Now let’s get into the jobs for 11-, 12-, and 13-year-olds and of course, how to make good money doing them.

Understanding Labor Laws

The United States Department of Labor is the governing body that enforces child labor laws. The law that has made the most impact on child labor is the Federal Labor Standards Act, which restricts the age at which minors can be hired and the number of hours minors can work.

There are very strict limits on jobs that can be performed by those under the age of 14. The Department of Labor offers a dedicated website to minors seeking to learn about employment; visit the US Government’s Youth Rules website to take advantage of this resource. The Youth Rules Government website provides a list of the types of jobs available to those under the age of 14. We’ve used this information as well as ideas from other sources to bring you the list of jobs below.

Jobs for Those Under the Age of 14

Just because you’re too young to be hired at your favorite restaurant or your local grocery store doesn’t mean you can’t earn money — you just need to think a little outside of the box. What skills, interests, or hobbies do you have that could bring value to someone? What chores, errands, or tasks can you take off of someone’s hands in exchange for money? Read on to find out some of the most common ways that those under 14 can turn time into money.

Jobs Around Your Home

You might not even need to look outside your house to find paying opportunities. These jobs can be done within the comfort of your home or yard.

Making and Selling Crafts

  • How much you can earn: Your earnings will depend upon the type of craft you make, the cost of the materials, and the labor involved. You’ll want to charge a retail price for your craft that covers all these costs, plus a little extra for profit.
  • How to find these jobs: Sign up for an account on Etsy or eBay to sell your handmade crafts. You can also research local craft fairs, as these events usually allow vendors to rent a booth and sell their goods.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: When signing up for an account with Etsy or eBay, you will need to enter a credit card number to charge the monthly fees. Ask your mom or dad before signing up if they are willing to let you use their credit card number. A parent may also need to help you with packaging and shipping once you have sold an item online. When setting up a booth at a craft fair, you’ll need their help in transporting your goods to the fair and assistance with setup and tear-down of your booth.

Lemonade Stand

  • How much you can earn: This will depend on the costs of making the lemonade. Calculate the cost of a cup, the lemons, sugar, and labor required per glass of lemonade, then add a little bit more for profit. If it costs $0.25 per cup to make the lemonade, consider charging $0.50 per cup for purchase. If you want to earn more, consider selling other items such as homemade brownies or cookies.
  • How to find these jobs: No searching necessary — set up a lemonade stand in your front yard.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: You may need to ask your mom or dad for their assistance in setting up a table outside and gathering the ingredients to make the lemonade. They may also need to spot you the money to buy the ingredients.

Chores

  • How much you can earn: You’ll need to negotiate with Mom and Dad on this one. Your pay will be determined by what chores need to be accomplished around the house and how much they are willing to give you for each task.
  • How to find these jobs: Ask your parents what chores need to be completed. You can also ask neighbors if there are any chores they need help with, and if they’d be willing to pay you for your assistance.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: You may need to convince Mom and Dad to pay you for tasks you should already be doing around the house for no charge. (After all, they are giving you free room and board.)

Your Family’s Business

  • How much you can earn: This will depend upon the type of business your family owns and how much they are willing to pay you. Typically, family members are expected to work for less than a non-family member.
  • How to find these jobs: Ask your parents or another family member who runs a business if they could hire you to help out.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: As long as your family’s business is not involved in one of these 17 hazardous industries as noted by the Department of Labor, you can go to work for your parents. If your family owns a farm or other type of agricultural business, be sure to check out the list of hazardous duties you are not allowed to perform.

Sell Collectibles

  • How much you can earn: It depends on how many items you buy/sell. Since you will likely finance your own business with past sales, takeoff will be slow. The more you sell, the more money you will have to buy and the higher your sales will become. Thousands per month is possible.
  • How to find these jobs: See if you can find a few things around the house to sell and then eventually buy things online and locally to resell.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: You must be 18 years of age to open a PayPal or eBay account but a guardian can do that for you. Hopefully they support your work ethic. For the most part, you’ll be selling online where no one knows/cares how old you are for the most part so the only real limitation is your will power.

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Jobs Around Town

Expand your opportunities by looking outside your house. You can capitalize on your neighbors’ need for someone to walk their dog, watch their young child, or rake their yard.

Agricultural Jobs

Back in the day, when the majority of families owned a farm, they had to rely on their children to help them tend the crops and take care of the animals. To this day, children under the age of 14 are allowed to work agricultural jobs, though certain restrictions apply.

  • How much you can earn: Earnings will vary widely depending on the farm and the hourly wage it pays its workers. (Most small farms that hire under-14 employees are not required to pay the federal minimum wage, so typically it will be less than $7.25 an hour.)
  • How to find these jobs: The best way to find a job on a farm is to inquire with large local farms in your area.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: Due to the danger of heavy farm equipment, there are numerous restrictions on the types of machinery a person under the age of 14 can operate. A child aged 12 to 13 may work on a farm outside of school hours only if their parents work on that farm as well, or if the child has written parental consent. Youths of any age may work at any time on a farm that is owned and operated by their parents.

Babysitting

  • How much you can earn: It will depend on the going rate in your area. It’s common for babysitters to earn about $10 per hour for one child, with an another $5 per hour for each additional child.
  • How to find these jobs: Ask your neighbors who have young kids if they need a babysitter. Find out from your parents if they have friends who need a babysitter, or start by babysitting your younger siblings.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: There’s no set age requirement for a babysitter, but a certain level of maturity is needed. It’s a good idea to invest your time in a CPR class, especially if you’ll be taking care of very young children or babies. The Red Cross offers CPR and child care classes to help you get certified.

Lawn Care & Snow Shoveling

  • How much you can earn: It will depend on the going rate in your area, but it wouldn’t be unreasonable to charge $10 – $20 an hour for your lawn care services. See this article for how much to charge for snow removal.
  • How to find these jobs: Look around your neighborhood for unkempt yards and lawns. Ask the owner if they need assistance with the upkeep of their yard. Place an ad on Craigslist for your services or put up flyers around town.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: If you can hold a rake, you’re probably old enough to do some light lawn care. If you plan to use a lawnmower, weed eater, blower, or another type of small lawn care machinery, be sure you are trained on how to operate it safely and properly.

Dog Walking or Sitting

  • How much you can earn: You could potentially command $20 for a half hour dog walk. Research the going rates by checking with local vets and dog boarding facilities, as these places typically charge customers to walk their dog. For dog sitting, you could charge up to $50 per day, depending on the requirements of the dog and its owner. Again, check with local dog boarding places to see what the going rates are.
  • How to find these jobs: Ask your neighbors who have dogs if they need their dogs walked or watched while they are at work or out of town. Post an ad on Craigslist for your dog walking and pet-sitting services.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: If a pet owner does not live within walking or bike-riding distance of your home, you’ll need mom or dad’s help in getting to their location. If school is in session, you’ll be limited in the time you’ll be able to walk dogs.

Acting or Modeling

  • How much you can earn: Depending on your talent and ability to book jobs, you can earn hundreds or even thousands of dollars per gig. Amounts will vary by the company who hires you. Keep in mind that a talent agency will take a percent of your earnings, and remember that it’s not easy to get this type of job — acting and modeling are both extremely competitive industries.
  • How to find these jobs: If you live near a major city (New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago, Dallas, Miami, etc.), research local talent agencies. Many agencies hire young people for modeling and commercials.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: Since you’re under 14, you’re going to need a parent or guardian to accompany you to each casting call and job. In the competitive modeling and acting industry, prepare for many “no’s” before you finally receive a “yes, you’re hired.”

Newspaper Delivery

  • How much you can earn: Depending on the number of subscribers to the newspaper, you could potentially earn $10 to $12 an hour.
  • How to find these jobs: Contact your local newspaper and ask if they are hiring.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: Some newspapers may require its couriers to own a properly registered and insured vehicle. Riding a bicycle to deliver newspapers isn’t as fast or efficient as using a vehicle. Therefore, you may need to have your parents or older sibling take you on your paper route.

Tutoring

  • How much you can earn: If you’re extremely smart and have a talent for teaching other kids, you could command $10 to $15 an hour.
  • How to find these jobs: Inquire with the school you attend and the elementary schools in your area for tutoring jobs. You could also post an ad on Craigslist.
  • Age requirements or other limitations: The only limitation is that parents may be hesitant to hire a very young tutor for their child. You’ll need to overcome this by proving how smart you are in the subject you are offering to tutor. Be prepared to show off your recent report cards, and consider getting letters of recommendation from your current teacher(s).

In Summary

Because of state and federal restrictions on the jobs for young employees, there are limits to the types of jobs those under the age of 14 can perform. However, for those who are motivated and persistent, young people can earn money by cashing in on your skills, no matter their age.

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27 comments

    • Kathleen Wilson says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Wolfia,
      Your best bet is to start talking to people you know — friends, family member, neighbors — and see if they have anything that they need help around the house with. Perhaps you could walk their dogs or babysit for them to make some extra money to help your family out! Best of luck

  • i want a dog walking job and was wondering should i put a poster up round my neighbourhood r should i keep looking online.

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Sophie,

      Putting up a poster is a great idea! Whether you’ll be able to find anything online depends on where you live. If you live in a small city, there probably aren’t that many opportunities posted online. But if you’re in a big city, you’ll probably have more luck online. Anyway, looking in more places will lead to more opportunities. In addition to putting up posters and looking online, I’d suggest talking to neighbors or family friends who have dogs. Networking is one of the best ways to find jobs. Good luck!

  • Kathleen Wilson says:
    First Quarter Finance logostaff

    Hi Xavier,
    You should check around your neighborhood. Try asking neighbors with dogs whether they would hire you to walk or care for their dogs, and if possible try to set up recurring hours, for example, agreeing to walk the dog once a week. You could also try using Craigslist, either to search for dog care job postings or to advertise your own services. Good luck!

  • Kathleen Wilson says:
    First Quarter Finance logostaff

    Hi Taylor,

    The best place to look for a babysitting job will be with relatives, neighbors, and family friends. It’s a good idea to ask your parents or your friends’ parents if any of them have friends who need someone to watch their kids after school. If you have experience babysitting younger siblings or cousins, that will be a big plus, so be sure to mention that when you’re looking for a job. Best of luck!

  • Need help says:

    Hi
    To be honest I don’t mind any thing but all I want is some spending money for my Blackpool trip and I know my mum and dad won’t agree.
    So I would love a job as an 11year old.
    I know what job and everything but how do I set up a lemonade stand outside my estate … don’t u need a permit or something.

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Need Help,

      Generally, you won’t need a permit of any kind to set up a lemonade stand in your own front yard. Any applicable permitting rules, if there are any, would be local, typically set by the municipality where you live. Try checking the website of your city government to see if they have any information about lemonade stands or similar pop-up businesses.

  • Ashley Orlich says:

    Hello,
    My name I Ashley and I would love to take care of your kids I love kids and have done it before. I am 12 year old and live in Matteson, and would love to start babysitting.

  • I want a babysitting job after school. I finish school at 2.30 and get home at 3. I am 11 years old.

      • Laura Bachmann says:
        First Quarter Finance logostaff

        Hello,

        You should try asking family friends with younger friends to start out. Because you’re young, it can be hard to find people who will hire you, so it’s best to start with those you know. From there, you can ask them to recommend you to other parents they know who need baby sitters. In this way, you can build your reputation and client base, and maximize your earnings.

  • Sylven Edwards Lamar jr says:

    I will take the tutoring class because my teachers pick me to tutor other people in my class.

    • Hillary M. Miller says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Zariah,

      The best place to look for a babysitting job will be with relatives, neighbors, and family friends. It’s a good idea to ask your parents or your friend’s parents if any of them have friends who need someone to watch their kids after school. If you have experience babysitting younger siblings or cousins, that will be a big plus, so be sure to mention that when you’re looking for a job. Best of luck!

    • Ask your parents if they want a day out without the children (if you have siblings) so you can take care of them get used to doing this. Then go around the neighbour hood and see if anybody else needs a day off and ask how much they are willing to pay. I done it, it is brilliant I earned a lot of money!

    • callum lewis day says:

      I would like to do cutting the grass or any job least i get paid need a job by the end of the week ASAP

      • Laura Bachmann says:
        First Quarter Finance logostaff

        Hi Callum,

        You should check around your neighborhood. Try asking neighbors with yards whether they would hire you to mow their lawn, and if possible try to set up recurring hours, for example, agreeing to mow the lawn once a week. You could also try using Craigslist, either to search for lawn care job postings or to advertise your own services. Good luck!

          • Laura Bachmann says:
            First Quarter Finance logostaff

            Hi bbrown,

            You should tell them your credentials — all the things that would make you a worth hiring as a dog walker. Good luck!