Can You Have Two Electric Bills in Your Name? Answered

You can have two or more residential electric bills in your name. Each bill will be connected to a separate address and usage charges will typically be mailed to the address on the account. We contacted several major electric companies across the U.S. to gather this information.

In order to pay multiple electric bills at once, you may be able to set up an online account, link the accounts in your name to the same username, and make a payment or payments. The following electric companies offer this option:

  • CenterPoint Energy (servicing Arkansas, Louisiana, Minnesota, Mississippi, Oklahoma, and Texas)
  • Commonwealth Edison (ComEd) (servicing Chicago and northern Illinois)
  • Consolidated Edison (Con Edison) (servicing New York City and Westchester County, N.Y.)
  • DTE Energy (servicing Michigan)
  • Dominion Energy (servicing Virginia, North Carolina, and South Carolina)
  • Florida Power & Light (FPL) (servicing Florida)
  • Georgia Power Company (servicing Georgia)
  • Oncor Electric Delivery Company (servicing Texas)
  • Pacific Gas & Electric (PG&E) (servicing California)
  • Portland General Electric (servicing Oregon)
  • Public Service Electric & Gas Company (servicing New Jersey)
  • Southern California Edison (servicing Southern California)

Some of the electric companies we contacted said they have portions of their websites dedicated to users with multiple accounts and/or property managers. Portland General Electric will even let you export billing information from your online account to an Excel spreadsheet.

Reasons You May Require Multiple Electric Bills in Your Name

Some situations that may call for more than one electric bill in your name include:

  • You are an adult caring for aging parents or relatives
  • You want to assist your college student or another family member by taking care of his/her utility bills
  • You have multiple residences
  • You have one or more income properties
  • You are moving and need to have utility services at both addresses for a time
  • You are managing a deceased relative’s property (See our related article on whether or not you can keep utilities in a deceased person’s name)