The 1950 $10 Bill: What It’s Worth, How to Sell, and More

How much is a 1950 $10 bill worth? Currency collectors are willing to pay considerable sums for bills that have unusual misprints or unique serial numbers. In this article, we focus on the 1950 $10 bill and the specific aspects that can increase its value far beyond what it can buy at the store. Certain 1950 $10 bills are worth hundreds of dollars to the right collector. Is yours one of them?

If you’ve discovered a 1950 $10 bill, don’t get too excited just yet; there are several things you should take into account before attempting to sell it. Age alone doesn’t necessarily mean the bill is worth a lot of money. In fact, age as a standalone measure has little to do with value when pricing currency. But, there are a wide range of irregularities which can make a 1950 $10 bill valuable. When appraising your 1950 1950 $10 bill, keep an eye out for these rare characteristics:…

How Can You Tell the Condition of a 1950 $10 Bill?

If your 1950 $10 bill is in pristine condition, meaning it has never been folded, torn, and has no severe wear, it may be worth more than face value. There are five different series of the 1950 $10 bill (A, B, C, D, and E) but all of them will sell for relatively the same price if they are in mint condition. It’s worth noting that a 1950 $10 bill wasn’t necessarily printed in 1950. Unlike coins, which are identified by the year they’re minted, bills are identified by the year that the design was adopted. A letter (series 1950A, 1950B, etc.) is added for every minor change to that same design.

A mint condition 1950 $10 bill from series A-D will likely sell for around $20, while the series E ten-dollar bill may sell for about $35 because the E series is rarer than the others. If you have fifty or more consecutive ten dollar bills from 1950, meaning they were all printed one after the other, this could demand a small premium for the collection.

Which Serial Numbers Are Most Valuable?

Irregularities in your $10 bill’s serial number can occur during production and may make it valuable to collectors. Here is a list of the most popular serial oddities.

  • Radar Example: C56788765A
  • Flip Example: C00069000A
  • Binary Example: C10100110A
  • Solid Example: C44444444A
  • Low serial number Example: C25225525A (Two or less digits featured)
  • Stand Alone Example: C00300000A (One number surrounded by zeroes)
  • Trailing Zeroes Example: C00000000A
  • Repeater Example: C11171117A
  • Ladder Example: C12345678A

In reference to the solid serial number, higher digits are rarer than lower digits, so higher digit solids will be worth more. And, if a solid serial number ends and begins with the same letters, this will only make the bill more attractive to buyers. Solid 9’s are extremely rare, so they are the most desirable, followed by solid 8’s. But, any solid serial number in good condition could earn you up to $500.

When it comes to ladder serial numbers, a true ladder contains all nine digits in ascending order. True ladders are only printed once every 96 million notes, so they are going to command a great premium. In fact, these bills are so rare that they deserve their own appraisal.

The repeater category includes binaries, ladders, or any type of serial number with three or more repeating digits.

Variations of all these serial oddities may increase the worth of a 1950 bill. There are so many variations that it’s hard to name an exact value for each one. But, if the bill is in excellent condition and contains an oddity, it will be worth more than face value.

How to Tell if You Have a Valuable Star Note

If there is a star after your bill’s serial number, this means the note was printed as a replacement for one damaged during production. These star notes were kept on hand and sent out as needed, so different star notes from different eras will vary in worth – based on how many were issued.

The most valuable star notes are those older than the year 1950, so in our case, having a 1950 $10 bill with a star on it is not enough to make it worth more than face value.

Why Doesn’t It Say “In God We Trust”?

If you have a 1950 $10, you might have noticed that something’s missing when compared to modern bills: the 1950-series $10 bill does not include the motto “In God We Trust.” These words were not added to the design of the $10 bill until the series after the 1950 design, the 1964 series. The same is true of the $1, $5, $10, and $20 denominations, which were not printed with the motto until 1964.

How to Identify Misprints That Increase Its Value

Misprinting refers to any errors that occurred during the printing process. It’s important to note that no misprint is unique. Often, when one mistake is made, many more notes are printed the same way before the problem is detected. So value is often based on the rarity of the misprint. If your $10 bill has a misprint that is quite common, it probably won’t increase its value by much, unless the bill is in mint condition. A common misprint on a wrinkled or folded ten-dollar bill will be disregarded by buyers.

Some examples of misprinting on 1950 $10 bills include incorrect seals, misplacement of correct seals, or any printing that obscures numbers. Over-inking or printing the front of the bill on the back, or vice versa, are also known misprints. A partial obstruction misprint means part of the image is missing; or maybe you have a bill where an image is missing altogether. The more severe the misprint, the more the note will be worth, so keep an eye out for the really bizarre ones!

Beware of the Upside Down Flag Myth

While doing research, you may hear that some 1950 $10 bills were printed with the American flag upside down. If you think the American flag on your bill is upside down, and if someone tells you that this will increase the value of the bill, don’t be too quick to believe them. The upside-down American flag is not considered an error, thus does not affect the value of the 1950 $10 in any way.

How Much Is It Worth?

So how much is a 1950 $10 bill worth exactly? If it is not in mint condition and does not have any unique identifiers, it’s only worth face value. The upside down American flag does not make its value increase since so many bills were printed that way. A mint condition 1950 $10 bill from series A-D will likely sell for around $20, double face value. While the series E $10 bill from 1950 is likely to sell for about $35 in mint condition. If you have any of the above listed serial number oddities, that $10 bill could be worth up to $500.

Where to Buy and/or Sell

The biggest platform is eBay. It’s straightforward, reaches a wide audience, and commissions are minimal.

Suggested Article: Here’s the Value of a 1950 $20 Bill

477 comments

  • I have 1950 10$ bill serie c,,,k93033155 the bill have #11 in the four corner and H in two corner

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi, Mario, it looks like the serial number alone won’t raise the value of your bill. The 11 is the district number for Dallas, Texas. All bills should have these numbers. So, your note isn’t worth more than face value unless it’s in mint condition.

  • Juan Rivas says:

    I have a $10 bill from 1950 series E and serial number B48060675K. I would like to know if it is worth anything more than its face value. Help will be appreciated.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Juan,

      It doesn’t look like your bill has any serial irregularities that would add to its value. However, you have a Series E bill, which may be worth as much as $35 if it’s in mint condition. Good luck!

  • Hi i have a 1950 series c, $10bill. Serial number is D33892479C. I am not sure but believe it is a greenback as well not sure if they all were but any help would be appreciated

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Josh, it looks like the serial number and series alone aren’t enough to make your bill worth more than face value. Unless your bill is in mint condition, it’s probably only worth $10. I’m sure what you meant by greenback. As I understand, greenbacks were a note printed during the civil war, and 1950 $10 bills aren’t greenbacks. But, if you were referring to something else by greenback let us know and we will do our best to help you out!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Josh,

      It doesn’t appear that your bill has any serial irregularities that would add to its value. But keep in mind that if your bill is in mint condition, you may be able to fetch as much as twice its face value from a collector. Good luck!

      • Thanks for the help plus on the back of the bill in bottom right corner is it normal for it to have a four digit number mine says 1752 on the back and c469 on the front

        • Rebecca Turley says:
          First Quarter Finance logostaff

          Hi Josh,

          The back number is the serial number of the plate used to make the bill. While I am not sure of the front number, I think you are referring to the note number position.

  • I have 2 bills from 1950 series D

    Serial numbers
    – A10327002D
    – A10307505D

  • Name* (displayed publicly) says:

    My $10 bill Series 1950e – L36782478D – Washington DC 12 has an upside down flag – average condition. What is it worth?

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi there!

      Your bill doesn’t appear to have serial oddities that would add to its value. However, because it is a Series E (more rare than other series), if your bill is in mint condition, you could get as much as $35 from a collector for it. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Lee,

      Unfortunately, your bill’s serial number doesn’t have any unique identifiers that would add value to it. However, always keep in mind that any 1950 $10 bill in mint condition with often sell for about twice its face value. Good luck!

  • Stacy Mathis says:

    Stacy mathis
    I have a 1950 series E 1950 Henry Fowler $10 star note with a serial g32555336* i dont know about any of the other charactics

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Stacy,

      It doesn’t look like your bill’s serial number has any unique identifiers that would add to its value. However, because it’s a series E (which is rarer than other series), if your bill is in mint condition, you can often sell it for about $35. Good luck!

        • Stacy Mathis says:

          I have several star marked bills in different denominations are they worth any more than a regular bill I have been told that they can be worth more than face value just because they are star marked most are current production no older than the 1990s where can I find any information on this thanks

          • Rebecca Turley says:
            First Quarter Finance logostaff

            Hi Stacy,

            Star bills can be quite valuable, provided they are earlier than 1950.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi James,

      Unfortunately, your bill doesn’t have serial oddities that would add to its value. However, always keep in mind that a 1950 $10 bill in mint condition is still worth about twice its face value to collectors. Good luck!

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Tim,

      It looks like your bill’s serial number might count as a repeater. Repeats alone usually don’t increase the value of the currency, but in your case, because there are five numbers repeated, e.g., five zeros, you might be able to find an interested collector. It’s probably worth contacting some collectors or posting the bill somewhere to see if you can get more than face value. Generally though, repeaters are only worth more than face value if they are part of a collection and/or if the bill is in mint condition.

      Good luck!

  • Hello i have a 1950 10 dollar bill series a the number its b60226781d it has four number 2 all around and the it has a misprint on one corner its blank on the back side erasing the 10 dollar is it worth anything? ?

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Ismael,

      The serial number alone doesn’t have any unique series that would raise the value. The number 2 means that the bill was printed in New York, and that alone also doesn’t raise the value of the bill. Misprints can increase the value of the bill, depending on how common that specific misprint is, which can give more specific appraisals. Many misprints are common, and alone won’t raise the value of the bill, especially if the bill is not in mint condition.

      Best of luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi there!

      It doesn’t appear that your bill has any serial irregularities that would add value to it. However, always keep in mind that these bills in mint condition often fetch as much as twice their face value. Good luck!

  • I picked up this old $10 1950 bill at work today, serial is nothing special and it’s fairly worn, but it’s rather off-center on the face, the ink at the top is nearly at the cut! The reverse looks normal.

    I doubt it’s worth more than face value, but I just want to be sure, thanks for taking the time to check for me 🙂

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Ken,

      Thanks for sending along pics! It sounds like you have a misalignment. Consider getting it graded by a reputable dealer who will let you know how rare (or common) this misalignment is and whether or not the edge has been trimmed to make it look misaligned. Severe misalignments are often worth about ten times the bill’s original value — about $100. But keep in mind the condition of the bill could affect the value. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Brian,

      Unfortunately, your bill does not have any serial oddities that would add to its value. However, keep in mind that a 1950 $10 bill in mint condition may be worth about twice its face value. Good luck!

  • Anthony Barricks says:

    A09247385* it’s misaligned it’s been in Circulation it looks to be in ok conditon an has a C stamp

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Anthony,

      Your bill doesn’t have any serial irregularities, so we can turn our attention to the apparent misalignment. The value of the bill will depend on two variables: (1) the severity of the misalignment and (2) the condition of the bill. I recommend having a dealer examine the misalignment for you. Good luck!

  • Name* (displayed publicly) says:

    I have an $10 dollar bill 1950 B
    G 37366532 F and a 1950 E
    G 76138083 H and a 1990
    G 76509564 C all $10 bills and a $2
    Bill 2009 G 04954574 A all has an 7 on them just want to know the value.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi there!

      While it doesn’t appear that any of your bills have unique serial numbers that would add to their value, your Series E bill may be worth more than the others, provided it is in mint condition. Collectors are often more interested in series E 1950 $10 bills because this series is rarer than series A-D.

  • hi i have 2 ten dollar bills 1950 D – seriel B 97695249 I and B 52847112J ARE these valuable? thanks

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi John,

      It doesn’t appear that your bills have any serial oddities that would add value to them. However, always keep in mind that collectors often buy mint condition 1950 $10 bills for about twice the face value even without any unique serial combinations. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Crystal,

      It looks like your bill doesn’t contain any unique number combinations that would add to its value. However, always keep in mind that these bills in mint condition are often sought by collectors who are willing to pay about twice their face value. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Lisa,

      Unfortunately, your bill doesn’t contain any serial oddities that would make it particularly valuable to a collector. However, always keep in mind that many collectors are more than happy to pay about twice the face value of a $10 1950 bill in mint condition!

  • Giovanni Padilla says:

    I have a $10 with the green star made in Chicago series 1950 E in a used condition with light discolor.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Giovanni,

      Unfortunately, any of the start notes of value were produced before 1950, and the used condition off the bill means it won’t be worth any more than face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi there!

      Unfortunately, your bill doesn’t contain any serial oddities that would add to its value, and folds of any kind also mean your bill is likely not worth anything beyond its face value.

  • Brittney says:

    I have a $10 bill Series 1950 A Serial G78081579D. Curious what the Small Q’s on the left and Q293 on the lower right means? And what does the 1690 mean on the back of the bill, lower right corner? Does this bill have any value other than face value? No rips, but has been in circulation and someone had folded it. Thanks!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Brittney,

      The Q293 on the back of the bill is the bill’s plate serial number. The Q stands for the number of times the Bureau of Engraving and Printing used the sequence of serial numbers on your bill. In this case, the Q means that it was the 17th time the sequence of serial numbers was used. There are 832 bills printed per serial number, so this bill was the 293rd bill. I’m not sure what the q’s are, but I suspect they are identifying the note number position. Although your bill doesn’t appear to have any serial oddities that would make it particularly valuable, keep in mind that if the bill is in mint condition, a collector may be willing to pay about twice its face value. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Chloe,

      Unfortunately, your bill’s serial number does not have any unique identifiers that would add to its value. However, if your bill is in mint condition, many collectors will pay about twice its face value. Good luck!

  • 1950 series $10 bill
    Serial # D19787752A
    Just wondering if it’s worth more than face value.
    No letter under series 1950.
    Plate # 1235

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Tonya,

      Although your bill’s serial number doesn’t have any characteristics that would increase its value, your bill without a letter means it’s the first in the series. If your bill is in mint condition, it may be worth about $15. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Julie,

      Unfortunately, your bill’s serial number doesn’t have any unique characteristics that would increase its value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • B40773827* is the serial number its from a 1950D series. Can this be worth anything ?

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Junior,

      Unfortunately, your bill does not have unique serial patterns that would make it valuable to collectors. However, if your bill is in mint condition, many collectors will pay about twice its face value. Good luck!

  • I have a 1950 A $10 bill in very good condition. Serial number B91193398C. I don’t know if it’s a rarity but it says Federal Reserve Bank of New York, New York. There is also a stamp on the back that reads “Ashraf Bros. Persian Gulf.” I don’t know if this helps or hurts the collective value of the bill. If you can offer any information it would be very appreciated! Thank you and God Bless!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Jason,

      Any marks that were not a result of the printing process will take away from any additional value the bill may have. Sorry I couldn’t bring you good news!

  • Hi, I have a 1950 B $10 bill in fair condition. No tears or discoloration but it has folds. The serial number is just one off a repeater. Is there anything else unique about it? Thank you. F84141419 B

  • Hi I was wondering if my 10$ bill was worth anything. Nothin serious, it didn’t look like it would be worth much than it’s face value. By I was curious h the same the number is B 84264450 F

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Nicolle,

      Your bill’s serial number doesn’t appear to have any unique identifiers that would increase its value, but keep in mind that many collectors will pay about twice the face value if your bill is in mint condition.

  • Mr. Edwards says:

    My question pertains to the plate number on the back of my 1950 E series $10 bill. The plate number is 1776, might that increase it’s value any?

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hello Mr. Edwards,

      I looked into it, and it appears that back plate numbers between 1390-1456 could hold slightly more value than others, although someone might be interested because of the unique number your bill has. If it’s in mint condition, it’s worth looking into!

  • I got 2 excellent condition never folded in plastic cover. 1950c
    B 35354352 I
    B 35354353 I
    Any help on placing a worth on these guys would be very helpful.
    Thanks.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Justin,

      Though your bills don’t have any unique identifiers, if your bills are uncirculated and are in mint condition (it sounds like they are), collectors may certainly be interested in your bills, often for about twice their face value.

  • Stephanie Worrall says:

    I have a 1950s b series 10 dollar bill serial #B40773992B is it worth anything?

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Richard,

      Your bill doesn’t appear to have any serial irregularities. A mint condition bill may be worth about twice its face value. However, pencil marks will often make it unattractive to buyers.

  • To whom​ it may concern..
    My name is Jeanette me and I have a 1950 ten dollar bill with the serial number b0093489a unfortunately it has been folded .I
    found it in a stack of bills I had gotten from the bank.its in pretty good condition otherwise..I was wondering if it’s worth anything..

    Thank you

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Jeanette,

      Your bill does not have any serial irregularities that would make it worth more than its face value. Although some 1950 $10 bills can fetch about twice their face value, they must be in mint condition (e.g., no folds or tears).

  • Mary Vajnce says:

    Have series 1950b serial number D97770953B worn with creases any additional value?

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Mary,

      Unfortunately, any worn 1950 $10 bill won’t be of value to collectors.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Will,

      Your bill doesn’t appear to have any serial irregularities that would make it particularly valuable, although keep in mind that many collectors will pay about double the face value for a 1950 $10 bill in mint condition. Good luck!

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Bill,

      Although your bill doesn’t have any serial irregularities that would increase its value, it is a series E, which is less common than the other series (A, B, C, and D). In mint condition, your bill may be worth as much as $35. Good luck!

  • Hello I have a series 1950 10 dollor bill which does not give a letter under the words series 1950 next to the Treasary signature. Mean anything? Thank you.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Mike,

      Great question. A bill with no series number means that it was the first of the 1950 series. I checked around and found that these bills in mint condition are going for about $15. Good luck!

  • Hi I have a 1950 $10series e in pretty good condition with serial number B49550424K also the bottom and left borders on the front of bill are about double the size of top and right but there is a marker mark about one inch long on front is it worth more then face value thank you

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Diana,

      Unfortunately, a bill that has been marked in any way won’t be worth more than face value.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Ryan,

      If your bill is in mint condition, you may be able to get about $20 for it, since it is a series C.

  • Erik Steven says:

    Hello my name is Erik and would love to know if my 10 dollar bill from 1950 is worth something. The serial number is G94022401H, thanks.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Erik,
      Although the serial number itself has no unique identifiers, if it has certain irregularities (Take a look at the article for examples of irregularities.) and is in mint condition, it may be worth more than face value. Good luck!

  • Christina O'S says:

    Also it is noticeably misaligned in the front. The left side is smaller than the right and the bottom is smaller than the top. There is no ink missing though. It is a circulated bill with no rips but does have folds

  • Christina O'S says:

    Hello I have 1950 ten dollar bill
    E52809062A. I thought it might be special because the serial number goes up ten in the middle and end
    52-62
    80-90

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Christina,

      It doesn’t look like the serial number includes any rare characteristics that would increase the bill’s value. The misalignment could be interesting to a collector, but unfortunately, since it’s not in mint condition, it’s unlikely to be worth more than face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • Matthew F. says:

    Hello I have 1950 10$ bill serial # b22931222k in great conditioin corners seem pretty square yet there is a flight fold in the middle of the bill were it was folded in half.

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Matthew,

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like your serial number contains any unique identifiers that would increase the value of the bill. Since the bill is not in mint condition, it’s likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • I have a 1950 $10 Bill, E series with the serial number as
    E66135716A
    Any value more than $10?

    I looked at some other 1950’s and they don’t have the same shade of green on the back like mine, curious as to what that would be?

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Uriah,

      Thanks for sending along the pictures! The color may be due to the oil-based printing method, but doesn’t indicate that the bill has any additional value for collectors. Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like the serial number of your bill contains any unique identifiers either. Since unique serial numbers, misprints, and mint condition are the most critical elements of a bill worth more than face value, it doesn’t look like your bill would be worth more than $10. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • I have a 1950 Series B 10 dollar bill. G34898239E. Curious if it is worth anything beyond its $10 value?
    Thank you

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      MnMan,

      Your serial number doesn’t seem to contain any unique identifiers that would increase the value. Unless it is in mint condition, the bill is likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • Spencer C says:

    Hey I have a $10 1950. Serial # D 92984568 A. Just wondering how much it’s worth.. thanks

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Spencer,

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like your serial number contains any unique identifiers that would increase the value of the bill. Unless the bill is in mint condition, it’s likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • Hey! The ATM wouldn’t take this odd looking $10, so I was wondering if it might be worth something. It’s a D series with the numbers: G22661197H

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Lisa,

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like your serial number contains any unique identifiers that would increase the value of the bill. Unless the bill is in mint condition, it’s likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

      • It’s definitely in amazing condition. Not a tear or anything at all, hardly even a wrinkle. I stuck it in one of my books for now.

  • Khathyryn says:

    10$ D74715298 B, $100 bill B 03633136 A, $100 G 04425016A, they all don’t have the In God we Trust, just wondering if they are worth anything. Thanks

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Khathyryn,

      The words “In God We Trust” weren’t added to the $10 bill’s design until after the 1950 series, so that’s to be expected for a 1950 series bill. Unfortunately, it looks like your serial numbers don’t contain any unique identifiers that would increase the value of the bills. Unless the bills are in mint condition, they’re likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

  • Hi there,
    I have a 1950’s $10 with a serial code B 127307320 F

    There’s a bit of a repeated sequence there, but would love your thoughts. Thanks!!

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Anna,

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like your serial number contains any unique identifiers that would increase the value of the bill. Unless the bill is in mint condition, it’s likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

    • Hillary M. Miller says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Luis,

      Unfortunately, it doesn’t look like your serial number includes any unique identifiers that would add to the bill’s value. Unless the bill is in mint condition, it’s likely only worth face value. Sorry I couldn’t bring you better news!

Comments are closed.