Petrified Wood Value: How Much Is Petrified Wood Worth? Answered

Short Answer: The value of petrified wood can range from under $1 to $700 or more depending on the piece’s size, color, quality, and whether it’s polished. See below for more information about the value of petrified wood and where to buy or sell it.

Petrified Wood Value Explained

Petrified wood can be valuable for scientific uses, as well as collectibility and artistic applications like jewelry or tabletops. There is no simple price-per-pound formula for petrified wood; its value depends on the particular piece’s size, color, polish, and quality.[1][2] Small samples of low-quality petrified wood may not be worth anything. In contrast, a high-quality petrified wood log can sell for several hundred dollars or more.[3]

It’s best to seek a professional appraisal (you can find a qualified appraiser through the International Gem Society), but we discuss the price factors below to give you some idea of what to expect from petrified wood prices.

Size

In most cases, the larger a piece of petrified wood is, the more valuable it will be. Some samples are as small as pebbles and worth less than $1; larger pieces, like whole logs, can be worth hundreds or even thousands of dollars.[4][1]

Small pieces of petrified wood are fairly common and not worth much. Tumbled or rough pieces — which are around one to three inches long — are usually worth $10 or less. Logs of 50 pounds or more, however, typically sell for $150 or more.[4] The value will continue to increase for larger and heavier specimens; for example, a log of around 175 to 200 pounds is worth around $500 to $700.[4]

Quality

Petrified wood is brittle and can become damaged over time through exposure to oxygen, weather, and other conditions. Well-preserved samples with characteristics like growth rings, wormholes, knots, or discernible bark patterns are the most valuable.[1][2]

Petrified wood is also more valuable after polishing; polish smooths the surface and enhances the look of the piece.[1] If you have an unpolished sample of petrified wood you wish to sell, you may want to polish it using a rock tumbler, rotary polisher, or another polishing method.[5] Note that smaller pieces (around 2 inches or smaller) might not be worth polishing since petrified wood at that size will have low value regardless of its other characteristics.

Color

Depending on the minerals involved in the fossilization process, petrified wood may be of various colors, including green, orange, blue, red, pink, or brown. Samples that contain bright or unusual colors are the most valuable; unpolished pieces in muted browns and grays tend to fetch the lowest prices. Certain types, like bright blue and purple tones, are especially rare and will fetch higher values.[1]

Identification

Petrified wood starts as a tree but more closely resembles a stone after becoming fossilized. When buried in mud or sediment, the wood becomes a fossil rather than decaying.[6]

While it may still be recognizable as wood, especially if the look of its bark is very well-preserved, it’s much heavier than regular logs.[7] Depending on the minerals present when the wood fossilizes, petrified wood can take on various unique colors and patterns, as noted above.[6]

Where to Sell or Buy Petrified Wood

Online auction sites like eBay[8] are one place to buy and sell petrified wood. However, depending on the weight of your piece, shipping costs can become expensive. If you’d prefer to buy or sell locally, look for a gemstone buyer near you or use a peer-to-peer platform like Facebook Marketplace to find local collectors.

Note that state and national laws may restrict your ability to take petrified wood from public lands; you shouldn’t take petrified wood from public land and attempt to sell it unless you’re sure of the laws that apply. For example, on Bureau of Land Management (BLM) lands, you can’t collect more than 250 pounds of petrified wood in a year and can’t sell it.[9] You can’t remove or sell petrified wood from national parks like Arizona’s Petrified Forest National Park.[10]

45 comments

  • Lashay Cahoon says:

    I have a very large petrified wood log I dug up. I’ve looked online to find similar pieces but can’t. I live in Alabama. It’s large and covered with many beautiful crystals. The dark crystals are very large. How would I find out any information on this piece, and why does part of it have tiny crystals and then the front have very large crystals? It’s very beautiful.

  • Good afternoon. We’re in El Paso, TX and we have a large amount of petrified wood with brown, beige, a lot of copper tones and white crystals forming around the sides. How would I go about getting more information on them and getting them appraised? Thank you.

  • Tim Gant says:

    I have a piece of petrified wood with colors of green, yellow, white, brown, and black. It’s about 3 foot tall and 16 inches wide and 5 to 6 inches thick. Not sure about the weight of it, 200 to 225 lbs. Just want to know about what it’s worth. Thank you.

  • Carl W Clark says:

    I own a piece of petrified wood from the petrified forest. 225 million years old. It has crystallized with bark attached. It is 5x5x3 inches. Two sides have bark.

    • Lindsey Desmet says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hello, Carl. That sounds like a very interesting piece of petrified wood! We do not provide individual valuations, but if you are interested in knowing how much your petrified wood is worth, you may want to sign up at JustAnswer and ask an expert. (Note that FQF may receive a commission if you sign up at JustAnswer and ask a question.)

  • Larry Hemeon says:

    I have found a 42-in. diameter measuring well over 72-in. long beautiful petrified log, can you estimate the value? I do not recognize the species.

    • Lindsey Desmet says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hello, Larry! Unfortunately, we do not provide individual estimates. You may want to sign up at JustAnswer — one of its experts may be able to tell you what your petrified wood is worth. (Note that FQF may receive a commission if you sign up and ask a question.) Best of luck!

  • I have a very large off-white piece and am wondering if it has any value. I’ve had it had for about 35 years or more.

    • Lindsey Desmet says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hello, Graham! Unfortunately, we are unable to provide individual appraisals. You can try signing up at JustAnswer; one of its experts may be able to provide a valuation for you. (Note that FQF may receive a commission if you sign up at JustAnswer and ask a question.)

    • Torrey Dion says:

      White is rare and worth more money. If it has thin lines throughout it is called “horsetail petrified wood.”

  • Alan Jones says:

    I have a black and white, 11-inch wide by 22-inch long piece I pulled out of my pump at work. I run a dredge and I dredge 100 feet deep. I got this caught in my pump bout 90 feet deep. My question is: Would this be rare since I found it so deep in the ground?

    • Lindsey Desmet says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hello, Alan! Unfortunately, we are unable to evaluate or appraise individual items. You may want to try signing up at JustAnswer, where a subject expert can thoroughly answer your question. (Note that FQF may receive a commission if you sign up at JustAnswer and ask a question.)

  • i have a live edge board 72″x30″x6″ slab weight approximately 900 lbs. It was used as an up right fountain with a hole drilled the 6′ length on a steel stand in the centre of a roundabout driveway. where would i sell this? it is not polished but smooth from years of water flowing across the surfaces.
    thanks

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Quentin,

      Sorry, I don’t have the answer to that. The piece in the photo isn’t ours, and we didn’t take the photo, so we don’t have anyway to know.

  • I have several pieces. Two of them are 4ft long. Several others about 2 feet long. One of them has brown sparkles inside. You can count the growth rings on several. We are from Texas and looking for someone to appraise them. Any suggestions near Dallas?

  • My husband and I have two very large and extremely heavy pieces. We’ve had them for 35 years. Came with some property we purchased. They are approximately 3’to 4’wide and 4’to 5’long. Would love to have them polished. Any thoughts on where to get this done? We live in San Antonio, TX. The predominant colors in both is salmon and red and yellow. Would love to see what the inside looks likes once the surface is polished down. Appreciate your thoughts and feedback.

    • Rebecca Turley says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Kathy,

      Sounds like you may have some magnificent pieces on your hands! I recommend contacting the Southwest Gem and Mineral Society. They are based in San Antonio, so I am sure they would be able to point you in the right direction regarding places to have your petrified wood polished and even appraised. Good luck!

  • Mike Brock says:

    I have a piece of PW that’s 29″ long, 16″ wide and 7″ thick. It weighs I am guessing 150 lbs. It came from the semo, Commerce, Mo. area. It is not mineralized but when cut with with a diamond blade it polish up beautifully. I also have one about , I am guessing 400 lbs., 6-7′ long, 16″ diameter, from same area. Could you please give me an idea what they are worth?

    • Laura Bachmann says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Mike,

      It’s very hard to give appraisals over the internet as the look and quality of the wood are so essential to its value. You should look for a local, professional appraiser. Try using the Midwest Federation of Mineralogical & Geological Societies’ directory of local gem and mineral clubs to find a group near you, then contact the group to see if they do appraisals, and if not, whether they can recommend an appraiser. You can also see listings of petrified wood for sale at Treasures of the Earth and on eBay, and use these as a comparison to get an idea about your pieces. From what I’m seeing, it looks like a piece with a weight similar to your smaller one could be worth over $500, and a peice weighing around 400 lbs could be worth over $1,000. The value of yours will, of course, depend on other features, like color and whether they are in good condition.

  • I just found a small piece of what looks to be black petrified wood that was mixed in the gravel in my backyard. There are definite striations on it, even some areas where it’s shiny. It’s pretty lightweight, and not fragile at all. At first, I thought it may have been a piece of tar or coal, but it wouldn’t burn. I live in Bourbonnais, Illinois. How do I find out for sure if it is, and if it is, is it of any value? It’s about LxWxH – 3/4″x1/2″x1/2.”

  • I have found serval pieces of petrified wood. The largest is a tree stump about 6th long with split branches. I say it weights close to 3 ton. It’s in the creek by my house in KY. It is very detailed, no cracks. I polished what I could reach of it and it’s beautiful. Is there any way to tell how much it’s worth? And is there any buyers willing to come and get such a large piece? Thank you.

  • I have a piece of petrified wood (about 15 lbs) that my parents took from the Petrified Forest in Arizona about 70 years ago or so. I have often thought about returning it. I would not want to be fined for its possession if I should make such an effort. Would I just be spinning my wheels in any effort to return it — i.e. would they even care if it was returned, would it be valued by them, would it just be thrown in the rubble, etc.

  • I’ve got a piece of petrified wood that is 24″ x 26″ x 16″ that is extremely heavy. It must weigh 400-500 pounds. It is extremely dense with very pronounce rings from the outer portion of what must have been a 4-6 foot diameter tree. I’m interested in selling it and/or cutting it to make an end table. I’m having a hard time finding an appraiser in my area. I live in Kennewick, WA. Any guidance or advice would be appreciated.

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Nathan,

      Wow, what an incredible treasure! Since it sounds like you have a very large piece of petrified wood, which may be potentially quite valuable, you’re wise in planning to have it appraised. (Stumps and large logs of high quality petrified wood can go for hundreds or even thousands of dollars.) The Lakeside Gem and Mineral Club, located in Kennewick, might be a good place to start; Lakeside Gem and Mineral Club provides a Contact Us page where you can ask about local resources for appraising and evaluating your petrified wood. You may also contact them on Facebook. I hope this helps!

  • Tonia Alexander says:

    We are new @ petrified wood findings, we live in Yazoo Co, MS, and have collected several thousands of pounds of beautiful petrified wood. It has become our passion, and we love looking for it. Every piece we’ve found has come out of Perry Creek. We are interested in selling it. Please put us in the right direction in finding a buyer or buyers in our surrounding areas?

    • Sarah Quinn says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Tonia,

      Since it sounds like you have a very sizeable collection of petrified wood, which may be potentially quite valuable, I would recommend going to a professional appraiser to get an estimate on the value of your collection. (Stumps and large logs of high quality petrified wood can go for hundreds or even thousands of dollars!) The Mississippi Gem and Mineral Society might be a good place to start; MGMS provides a Contact Us page where you can ask about local resources for appraising and evaluating your collection of petrified wood. You may also contact them on Facebook. You may also consider contacting The Eastern Federation of Mineralogical and Lapidary Societies, Inc. (there are contact emails towards the bottom of the page). This is a regional association of societies that might be able to provide you with more widespread resources. Best of luck with your impressive collection!

  • Janice Seal says:

    My dad collected petrified wood when he was working on two sites in va.I have many large pieces and want to know what they are worth and how to sell them. They start at 2ft.and go to at least 10ft in length. He worked for a gravel company and it was dug up when they were getting the gravel out.I also have a large stump I use as a place to sit out in the yard.I live in Richmond Va. any ideas on who I can get in touch with to find out the worth and if its sellable Thanks

    • Hillary M. Miller says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Janice,

      Since it sounds like the pieces of petrified wood that you have are very large and potentially quite valuable, I would recommend going to a professional appraiser to get an estimate on the value of your collection. (Stumps and large logs of high quality petrified wood can go for hundreds or even thousands of dollars!) The Richmond Gem & Mineral Society might be a good place to start; this organization provides a Contact Us page where you can ask about local resources for appraising and evaluating your pieces of petrified wood. (You can also visit the group on Facebook.) You may consider contacting The Eastern Federation of Mineralogical and Lapidary Societies, Inc. (there are contact emails towards the bottom of the page). This is a regional association of societies that might be able to provide you with more widespread resources. Best of luck with your collection!

    • Jess Gateley says:

      I have three large pieces of petrified wood about4.5-5′ long approximately36″-50″in diameter. One of which has very visible rings.its found innortheast arkansas. My guess is they weigh between 800 and 1,200 lbs. Can you tell me anything about its value?

      • Laura Bachmann says:
        First Quarter Finance logostaff

        Hi, Jess, your pieces are much larger than normal, which could mean they do have significant value, possibly over $100. Quality, which you didn’t mention, is also a very important factor in determining value. If your pieces don’t have any holes, cracks, and aren’t porous, they’ll be worth more. In fact, if they are porous or cracked they might not have any sale value because petrified wood can deteriorate and this sort of damage is one of the indicators that it will. Petrified wood from Arkansas is young, geologically speaking, so the location you found probably won’t significantly increase its value. You can try checking current eBay listings for petrified logs to see how your pieces compare.

  • Hello, A few years ago I purchased a highly polished bowl of petrified wood. It’s of an amber colouring, streaks of light and dark. I believe its weight is .290 as that is the number written underneath it.

    I’m looking for an approximate value of it as I’m thinking of selling it. Thank you for your help.

    • Hillary M. Miller says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Lizette,

      Prices can vary quite a bit depending on the condition and dimensions of the bowl, as well as the origin of the petrified wood. For example, this 5-inch petrified wood bowl from Madagascar Minerals is selling for $119, while petrified wood bowls on eBay range from around $30 into the hundreds of dollars. I would recommend searching online through eBay (or simply running a Google search for “amber petrified wood bowl” along with your item’s dimensions) to find similar pieces; this will provide a good way to determine the value. You can also take the piece to a professional appraiser for a more precise estimate on the value. I hope this helps, and best of luck with your piece if you decide to sell!

      • Gary Glaesemann says:

        One thing to remember if you’re trying to assess something’s value on ebay is you need to only use “SOLD” items to base your value on. Putting a value on something by using listings on ebay is only effective if an item has been sold, not just listed.

        • Sarah Quinn says:
          First Quarter Finance logostaff

          Gary,

          Thanks for the tip! That’s great advice, and I’ve already updated our article with the added detail about searching for similarly priced items on eBay. We appreciate your comment!

  • Angela Davis says:

    I recently acquired a magnificent piece of petrified wood, with appears to be full of fire Opal stone. One local rock enthusiast is certain this piece could be worth thousands based on how many rings can be made & the intensity of the Opal.
    I was able to locate an expert for appraisal from the gem society search.
    I am at a loss now, not sure where to begin..
    Kind Regards, Angela

    • Hillary M. Miller says:
      First Quarter Finance logostaff

      Hi Angela,

      Congrats on your exciting find! The International Gem Society is a great place to start; if you are able to find a nearby expert to appraise the piece, you can contact them to set up an appointment (you may need to Google the name of the appraiser or organization in order to find their contact information). If the International Gem Society doesn’t provide any results, a simple Google search is another good option — try a search for “gem appraisal near me” to generate some local options. You can also ask for a recommendation for a local appraiser on a gemstone or rock collection forum, such as the FMF Minerals Forum or Rock Hound Lounge. Once you have a professional estimation of the petrified wood’s value, the appraiser may be able to buy the piece directly, or refer you to a buyer. You can also consider listing the piece on eBay (perhaps for local pickup only, to save on shipping fees) once you know how much it’s worth. I hope this helps and please let me know if I can answer any further questions!